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CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
inauguration day in washington d.c. a huge amount of people gathered on the washington mall. 2009 it was all away from the capital of a way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. there we go. and they are there, of course, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also g
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 1:15pm EST
inside account of how washington abandoned mainstream while rescuing longstreet. he argues that the $700 billion troubled asset relief program or t.a.r.p. program was mishandled. about 40 minutes. >> joining as now his kneele brodsky, a former inspector general for tart -- t.a.r.p. you saw him earlier on a panel. here's the cover of his best seller called "bailout." how did you become the inspector general? >> it is kind of a strange thing, especially for me. i was a federal prosecutor up in the southern district of new york. i spent the years leading into the financial crisis during securities fraud cases and earlier in 2008i started the mortgage fraud group that was targeting, you know, those types of cases that really helped lead to the financial crisis, major fraud in the mortgage finance system. so after the t.a.r.p. bill was passed, congress enacted this marble piece of legislation, they included within this new agency called the office of the specialized sector general for the trouble as a relief program. this incredibly great, you know, washington is the city of acronyms, an
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
great american venue so let's begin. it's dawn on inauguration day in washington, d.c.. a huge amount of people gather on the washington mall. in 2009 and was all the way from the capitol all the way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. they are there for the inauguration. people gather to watch and other places as well. in times square in the new york city and classrooms around the country in paris and iraq and afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there and there is a big crowd on the mall. i'm going to speak to you today about this great historic subject come of this institution and i am not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which organized the book. rather the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also going to cover so
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:15pm EST
annual national book festival on the national mall in washington d.c. robert caro presents the fourth volume of his biography of lyndon johnson, "the passage of power," the years of lyndon johnson. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. that was such a wonderful introduction. such a wonderful introduction it reminds me what lyndon johnson used to say when he got a nice introduction. he used to say he wished his parents were alive to hear it. he said his father would have loved it and his mother would have believed it. you know, when winston churchill was writing his great biography of his ancestors someone asked him how -- he said i am working on the fifth of a projected four volumes. i am not comparing myself to winston churchill but regard to the lyndon johnson biography we are in the same boat. i have been writing about lyndon johnson so long that people ask me don't you get bored? the answer is the very opposite is true. the one reason i don't think of these books as being about lyndon johnson just as i didn't think of the power brokers being about ro
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 5:15pm EST
the dollar. the threat comes from washington and wall street. i make that new arguments in the new edition of "wealth and poverty." >> george gilder come you rate the united states over the last decade has witnessed a classic confrontation between the forces of entrepreneurial capitalism and those of established institutions, claiming a higher virtue, expertise and political standing. once i subsist on unforced for the enterprise. the other on branson told some privileges at the treasury, the federal reserve and the white house. >> that is exactly what we've had. when michael lewis wrote up a bit short. he is writing about all the jackal of hedge funds and the bed against the big banks were all supporting these subprime mortgages concoctions, confections and scans. it was all the most prestigious forces in both u.s. and the world economy that backed the blindsided by collet, people who are investing in these crazy concocted mortgage securities in which the value was totally unknown by the people investing in a period the people shorting means were hatch funds in venture funds and p
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 10:00pm EST
was a couple of days' ride from monticello to washington. he stopped at an inn and falls into a conversation with a fellow guest and they have a lovely, wide ranging discussion the next morning the other guest mr. jefferson is up and out and the other guest had never called his name and he said to the inn keeper who was that and he said who did you think it was? for a while and you knew so much about medicine i thought he was a doctor. then we talked about theology and he seemed as though he might be a priest though a shaky one. i thought he could have been certainly a farmer because of everything he knew and he said i thought you knew mr. jefferson. he was a master of so many different worlds and he was indefinitely curious at the time when human curiosity and the ability to lead us to our own destiny to fulfil in many ways our greatest potentials to discover, to explore was new in the world and this was the enlightened era. they had been a day before yesterday. for the first time ever, priestley and princely authority was in the dhaka, and jefferson was there to reap the harve
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:45pm EST
to mess with washington, d.c., go ahead. that's absolutely fine. but -- [laughter] but i've been living in washington, d.c. for a long time and watching policy debates go on. and i've never seen a president that was as down in the weeds secretly as president bush is. and i just wanted to start with a little anecdote that, actually, i think the 4% solution was visible back then, but way long, long ago in the early years of president bush's administration, he called a bunch of nobel prize-winning economists into the white house to meet x it was my very first time seeing president bush, and i think it was the roosevelt room, it might have been. and i was very nervous, of course, and i wondered what the heck am i doing amongst all these great economistses, and then i wondered what president bush was like. and right at the beginning of the meeting he started requesting questions that had been bugging him about moral hazard of very technological issue. when he came up to washington, he was a policy wonk too. and that's why the bush institute, i think, has been founded, because presiden
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 2:00pm EST
war that we were invaded from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, telling us the israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger is going to move on with provided doctors. when the telegram was sent from the state department to the embassy during yom kippur, the egyptian and syrian armies were already on their way to destroy the jewish state. that is an example of a mistake because the leader at the time, she was afraid to take a preemptive attack. she was afraid to hold the reserve because she said i don't know what will be the reaction in washington. and dr. kissinger was very strong. nixon was going down, he was going up and she was afraid from his reaction. because of her approach, we almost lost the world. that is why today we do with the issue of iran, we have to take the decision which is good for israel. maybe it will not be popular in the u.n. for sure. everything you say about israel and the standard of the one
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:45am EST
washington and elsewhere, quote: like the poor, we have shriver always with us, end of quote. nevertheless, between 1964 and 1968 one-third of america's poor moved upward out of poverty. by the spring of 1968, tension over the budget priorities led shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in stormy chicago, shriver's name again came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on a flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family, still grieving from the recent death of robert, raised an objection in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success in repairing the alliance with france weakened birdies agreement about the vietnam -- by disagreement about the vietnam war, had prompted president pix son to retain him -- nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when democratic nominee george mcgovern was forced to drop his running mate, and eventually through a process of elimin
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 12:30pm EST
ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, manhattan institute's senior fellow and our speaker this afternoon, focuses in her timely and important new book "regulating to disaster: how green jobs policies are damaging america's economy." in it she subjects the assumptionings and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now-bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a123 battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect from this oxford-trained economists who served as chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book she adeptly helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both significant problems in the themselves and cautionary tales for those who would have the
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00pm EST
asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i and his two dogs have lunch together on monday since the dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session and they could of rome and play. was a weird sight, believe me. we were brought into the tiny little conference room, the two dogs, the senator and me with a card table in the middle, and the senator who was always on a diet. he would feel better the center he was head the biggest sand which i'd ever seen like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was and on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of bread and potato chips and we talked for three or four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i am a historian, and i went find stuff, and whenever i find i'm going to put in the book and who knows, by the time this book comes out there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's naim what the joseph p. kennedy iii who ran f
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid of fannie mae and the retribution it needed out to people who dared to cross it. on hubris, fannie often claiming it was the center of, quote, of the best housing finance system in the world. so ironically in retrospect, of course. this sentiment being echoed by former senator, banking committee chairman dodd, exclaiming that fanny was, quote, one of the great success stories of all time. and so it was until the fall and humiliation. all five acts are very well chronicled by bob's book, but which shakespearean tragedy is this in the background behind the history of fannie mae. thinking of the fear of any, perhaps it is richard iii, with annie and ruthless richard, brought down finally on the field of buzz words by henry paulson playing henry vii or thinking of than fannie ceo dennis mud as presented in the book, pathetically presenting financial plans to a treasury department which have already decided on and was scheduling his fate. is it the great pathos pull abdications seen from r
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
pretty much fulfilled george washington's third term in national security matters. >> finally, how did the middle-class figure into your thesis? >> while the middle-class figures then, and they are the ones that got shafted because there was a bipartisan move. clinton was president. the republicans mainly were running congress when we have rings like nafta, china's most favored nation status, the wto, the world trade organization. all these trade deals -- trade deals that people believed were going to bring jobs to the united states, and in every case the jobs left. >> in now on booktv, the history of united states in 1862. is the second year the civil war and specifically reactions of president abraham lincoln. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> the thank you very much. a wonderful crowd. thank you to regnery books, a real asset to our community here. with all these programs. i am glad to see my kids in the audience, who asked me to mention their names. henry, alice, abby, claire and my wife karen is here and my mother doris and many friends but also the basis as well. than
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30am EST
washington post staff writer, he is also the author of "the rise of marco rubio." manuel roig-franzia, what should we know about pube -- marco rubio that we may not know right now? >> guest: well, what you ought to know is that he is more than any other republican politician positioned to have a big impact on what that party does vis-a-vis immigration. such an important issue, such an important demographic. and it was proven in the election, and you're going to be hearing a lot from him on that topic in the next four years. >> host: is so how did he play it in the 2012 cycle? >> guest: well, he was a big surrogate for mitt romney. he traveled all over the country. it was a terrific way to introduce him to people outside of florida. even though he's very popular in florida and had a stunning victory in the 2010 senate race -- not a win that a lot of people expected him to get when that race started, you know, he was facing this very tough candidate, charlie crist, who was a popular governor at the time -- but outside of florida his profile was much smaller. and now he's been introduced
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
realized it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in session and they could roam and play in the senate. that's a weird site, believe me. we were brought into a tiny little conference room for two dogs, senator and me with the card table and the senator, who was always on the target. they believed he would feel better the center he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was end on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of red in potato chips. we talked for three, four hours. but i remember saying over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i'm an historian and i'm going to find stuff. whatever i find, i'm going to put the book. and who knows, but by the time this book comes out, there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's na
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 1:00pm EST
library of congress and washington d.c. >> earlier this year walter dean myers was named as the third national ambassador for and people's literature this is a non-profit arm, every child a reader. the notion of the national ambassador would be someone who traveled the country on behalf of young people's literature promoting it and also expanding the audience for reading in every way that we can think of. my proper today you already have . on the table in the back there is a bookmark which has walters photo and also a brief explanation of the national ambassador program. it lasts for two years. walter is midway through his 2-year term speaking on behalf of reading. today we're going to learn a little bit about his experience, but i would like to start by asking him how he chose his particular theme for his activity, which is reading is not optional. walter, do you want to tell us a little bit about how that came to be your team and a little bit about -- i happen to know it is his own early background that helped lead to this. >> as i began speaking to young people and how we approach
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00pm EST
, like washington, dc, you cannot even make that argument. washington, dc, the jurisdiction that has the "just words" doctrine, and the law says no matter what the word, no matter what somebody calls you, that's no excuse for using violence. but other jurisdictions say, we'll let you make that argument to a jury. >> host: professor kennedy, you write in the n-word book, there's nothing necessarily wrong with a white person saying the n-word, just as there is nothing necessarily wrong with a black person saying it. what should matter is the context in which the word is spoken. the speaker's aims, effects, alternative, to condemn whites to use the n-word without regard to context is simply to make a fettish of the word. >> guest: yes. the best example to illustrate that point is mark mark twain'st novel, huckleberry finn. anythinger appears in that book over 200 times. i think huckleberry finn is a wonderful novel and its impulse is antiracist. antislavery, obviously over the years there have been many people who wanted the book banned or wanted to erase the word. i'm not for that. you
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 11:00am EST
say because i am from washington and because it is halloween and because i have three children, all of them love to trick or treat our will report that the most popular costume that has come up lately is binders full of women. what this halloween costume looks like is you put your arms in the binder, it is not a jack in the box but jacqueline in the box and jacqueline pops out of a folder in the halloween costume. who said we were dull in washington? we are very creative. i am going to tell the story that inspired me to write my book. this began in 2009. the book is based on an atlantic story that came out in 2010 and basically i had been vacationing in a town for a long time which was a prosperous working-class town and one year i went there a bit seemed there are not many men are round. i was seeing him in church or the fair grounds or driving down the street ritter trucks doing construction. this was the height of the housing collapse that anita hill talked-about. men were finding a hard time. we talked about the man session and loss of manufacturing jobs and i became curious abo
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:45pm EST
important it is to know. [applause] >> next from the georgetown university law center in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about one hour and ten minutes. >> hello, everyone. i want to welcome you to today's program, which features an all-star lineup of authors who will be discussing their most recent books on the supreme court. i am a professor here at georgetown and executive director of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event and i would like to thank our deputy director for putting it all together. before i turn the program over to our moderator i would like to remind everyone that after the program we have a reception following in which he will get a chance to have all of your newly purchased books signed by the authors and have a word or two with the authors hopefully coming in as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderator for today's program. tony really needs no introduction at all sali will keep it sh
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30am EST
senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington, and the senator and i and his two dogs had lunch together. on mondays his dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session, and they could roam, yeah, play in the senate. it was a weird sight, believe me. [laughter] we were brought into a tiny little conference room. the two dog, the senator and me with a card table in the middle. and the senator, who was always on a diet, they believed that his back, he would feel better the thinner he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, you know, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was. and on a piece of bread. i add two pieces -- i had two pieces of bread and potato chips. [laughter] and we talked for three, four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book. because i'm a historian, and i'm going to find stuff. and whatever i find, i'm going put in the book. and who knows, but by the time this book comes out, there might b
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 9:00pm EST
politics in washington. >> host: well, bob, we have to comment as an employee of usa today, comment on usa tomorrow. >> guest: and the day after. i should thank sarah for the plug for that. what we did, the newspaper is, i think, in september was 30 years old so a a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like in 30 years from now, which would be, what are we talking about? 2042. you're better at math than i am. i -- anyway, they made predictions, and they talked about what it means for their industries, and we put out a little tab, and now that tab, tab or little sheet, is now an e-book, which i think you can buy for the grand total of $1.99 or $2.99. they have not really taken off yet. these short form, somewhere in between a book and a amazing, byliner does a lot of good ones, and amazon has been doing them. they can be posted almost immediately, and they sell for -- $2 or $4, maybe more. a few made the best seller list. some have been fiction. amy tan wrote a story called "too long to be a short story and too short to be a nov
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 2:00pm EST
popular government and it stunned official washington. in china mao tse tung's people's liberation army and shanghai check's nationalist forces on the run the following year, the communists would assume command of the world's most populous nation. 1950 was a particularly eventful year. in january scientists called fuchs surrendered to british authorities admitting he was a nuclear spy the same month a halter hiss was convicted of perjury. the statute of limitations on espionage have inspired and he was sent to jail. in may, the fbi arrested harry gold who identified julius and ethel rosenberg as conspirators in a plot to give nuclear secrets to moscow. in june, north korea invaded south korea and presented the u.s. with a choice, turn back the invasion or allow the communists to secure a key piece on the chessboard of asia. in 1952 whitaker chambers published "witness". which argued that the united states faced a transcendent, not a transitory crisis, was not one of politics or economics but of faith, and secular liberalism, a watered-down version, no wonder the liberals have never
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 2:05pm EST
washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently given the great honor by his colleagues at the washington college of law to have a lecture named after him. congratulations and thank you for joining us. [applause] so our topic is copyright and the book. very small topic. copyright and the book, authors, publishers and the public interest. i want to reflect on the title for a moment. copyright and the book is at its core a discussion about the public interest. with arthur's and publishers as part of the public interest. i would underscore that because in the more recent conversations, in political circles, it sometimes teed up as a conversation where publishers and authors are somehow and difficult to or at least in competition with the goals of the public and that is not the foundational history of copyright law in united states. we will talk about incentivizing authors, evaluating publishers, serving readers, protecting freedom
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 4:15pm EST
. >>> next from the georgetown university law certainly in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about an hour ten minutes. >>> hello, everyone, want i want to welcome you to the program which features an al star lineup of authors who will be doing the most recent book on the supreme court. i'm a professor here at georgetown. and executive directer of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event, and i'd like to thank our deputy directer dory burn seen to putting it together. before i turn the program over to our moderators, i'd like to remind thearch after the program, we have a reception following in which you'll gate chance to have all your newly purchased books signed by the authors. have a word or two with the authors, hopefully, and as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderators. today for today's program tony morrow. tony needs no introduction at all. i'll keep it short and tell you that tony has long been one of the
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:00pm EST
night. or if you are a tourist suppose you go to washington, d.c. on the congressional hearing that there may be a very long line if it is a popular hearing. and you may not like standing in long lines you can now go to a company called line standing dhaka, and pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone usually a homeless person or someone that needs to work to hold the place on line for hours and hours overnight if need be. and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing by the way, if you would rather sit in an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. a longstanding dhaka, or suppose you want to contribute to a alleviating a social tragedy in this country. each year thousands of babies born to a drug-addicted mothers there is a charity you can contribute to that tries to use a market mechanism to solve this terrible problem. they offered any and drug addicted woman $300 to be sterilized. the use of the market incentive. or suppose you have a new drug let's say you are a pha
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 3:00pm EST
effective feedback mechanisms. let me go back and remember a little bit when i first came to washington after my doctorate and one of the first books i was exposed to was tom's book titled the state of ridge, where the government sponsored enterprise in the financial crisis, clearly tom was years ahead of his time at his predictions turned out to be all too accurate. a very long track record of being one of the 04 most forecasters of the state of the financial-services industry but when he is not writing books he spends his time as a fellow at the center for dance to governmental studies at johns hopkins university. tom also served as staff on the financial crisis inquiry commission and in my opinion there are a few things i would disagree with the commission's findings one thing i know for certain is the commission's report was stronger because of tom's involvement. the book is also informed largely by tom's experience on commission staff. we are fortunate to have with us alex pollock to offer his thoughts on the book. alex is resident fellow at the american enterprise institute. i got
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 1:00pm EST
further than the congress, the 100th of congress in washington. gridlock, nothing gets passed. the least of legislation and the last 50 years. why? because everybody is campaigning all the time. there is very little by way of relationships across the aisle. and we went out to the brink of the debt ceiling crisis before. compromise was reached which was routine in the past. so we thought that by focusing on the problem of congress whose popularity is at all-time lows. john mccain said, you can account for that 9 percent popularity of congress during the debt ceiling crisis by blood relatives and paid staffers. we saw it by focusing on congress weekend above the diagnose the problem and give some prescriptions for how to overcome it. >> what is one of those prescriptions? >> well, one of those prescriptions is very simple, which is, congressmen need to exercise mixing mind sets, by putting aside the campaigning mindset long enough to govern. and adopting the compromise might said. in order to do that they have to have relationships. so they should spend more time in washington and less tim
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 12:15am EST
foreign policy. what is foreign policy? >> guest: divisional, washington post foreign policy magazine, the foreign policy website which is not much bigger than the magazine, three million visitors on the web site and runs a series of events and other programs on international issues. >> host: mr. rothkopf, in "power, inc." you have a chapter about a swedish boat. what is that story? >> guest: i wanted to go to the origin story of the company. companies in one form or another have existed since the beginning of time but the oldest corp. still in existence is a swedish company that started perhaps 1,000 years ago when a goat wandered away from its owner and came back with red horns because it had shrunk from a stream that was full of copper ore and the owner came back and found the extreme and started digging for copper ended became a copper company and became a company called totenberg which means great copper mountain and is now primarily in the paper business. about $20 billion a year in sales it is bigger than a couple of dozen countries itself and the fact that it existed so long and is
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:30pm EST
the national book festival in washington d.c. with sally bedell smith montana. you are on the air. >> caller: does the queen acknowledge the base is anglo-saxon driven? >>guest: definitely. she has a lot of german heritage. her family began with george from mac 12 was descended from hanover that came over in the 18th century and when queen victoria married prince albert from germany but there is in english strain as well. the queen mother was from an english slavish scottish family. it is a mix. there is a significant german lineage. it was a problem right before world war i when the family name was very germanic and her grandfather king george five change the names of all people so they were less germanic and other names were
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 1:30am EST
the washington quarters are $119 on the set on in quebec when bases, susan b. anthony collection are $30.and let me explain to you but this is. you will get a united government issue and said and what it is let me get these outa collection of coins and this is just a clear and here, it is hard but this shot is spectacular but it is all of the uncirculated coins this is one year and this is 1980, this is of the brilliant uncirculated coins . you're about 75ยข a coin and there are three susan b. anthony and this collection 1983 susan b. anthony. there is also 1979 susan b. hatch is what you will happen here we have $42 worth+ susan b. anthony brilliant uncirculated. the man goes in and circulated as well.% you look of those civil get all of the kennedy half dollars in you will get 20 years, 40acts because the chair has philadelphia mint and memory, 68 and 69. [reading] you will get in here6 c13 me go here, 1976 and up and get into this at but how about to eisenhower dollars that you will happen here. i do think that this is a good opportunity for you to get those but those are about $1
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 4:30pm EST
that government does. simplify the tax code for tax complexity has washington revolves around it. they lose the power for the brainpower to doing productive things. and so yes, the thing to remember about spending if the money doesn't come from the head. it comes from you. you spit it out to politically favored constituent groups. that's not stimulus, more like waste. >> host: just go back to your original point, would you like to see no floating currencies. we had it for 180 years. it provides stability and value is 60 minutes, 16 ounces in a pound. so it doesn't restrict money supplied to have a vibrant economy of blossoms. a stagnant economy stays stagnant. what it means is if you make a contract to years from now that a fixed amount of dollars from the value of the dollar to years of the same messages today. when you make an investment company you are in effect when you value that investment is the future stream of income and net present value. so if your facebook shoes because you think it's going to pretend times in the next five years, you don't know what the dollars going
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00pm EST
found belle's birth certificate, actually, in washington. she was born in washington, and it tells her birth date and lists 'c' for colored. and the family lived in washington for some years. greener was dean at the howard university law school. he was a very distinguished lawyer and scholar, an active republican. the republicans rewarded him for his service, recruiting blacks for the party, by making him the secretary of the grant monument in new--ulysses s. grant monument in new york, and he was appointed us consul in vladivostok by mckinley and roosevelt. but at some point, around that time, in the late 1890s, the family split up and they were--he was the darkest. the mother was very light-skinned and the children were very light-skinned. so they dropped the r off the end of their name and the mother said her name was genevieve i. greene, widow, although mr. greener was very much alive. and they brought--invented the name da costa, i think, to explain their exotic looks. and belle passed as white for the rest of her life, as far as i know. i don't think morgan ever knew that she
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 2:30pm EST
washington metro area. about 3 million people. imagine all those people blind. now they can see. that's not -- that's not an obscure story. it's not an obscure story in the world of people. people know about the hospital. people travel from all over the world to go to the hospital to train to bring the same programs to their countries. it becomes a movement to end needless blindness. it's one example you might say that's -- got to be an exception. hundreds and hundreds of stories like that. and those are the stories that are transforming the global economy. not just the economy, societies building the future. >> so as you say in the next twenty years, 3 billion more people will enter to the world of economic freedom or another least -- >> right cognitive freedom. economic freedom. >> is the wild west does it need to be managed? how should it be managed? >> well,, you know, i like the core metaphor in describing the economy and the interaction of the economy and the society is reinforced. and when we go the rain forest whether it's the pacific northwest or amazon, you have the sense of l
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
susan eisenhower the granddaughter of the dwight eisenhower at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c.. this is about 50 minutes. .. >> the answer was there is no plan. i blew up, not for the first or last time, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 3:05pm EST
washington, i think, no one should go to washington without reading that book. [laughter] max boot, in the times when laws and rules and principles of strategy seem to be overwhelmed or out of date, he's become thee authoritative voice on military affairs always with amazing, consistent, unquestioned integrity, which is also kind of a rarity in the field which is marked often by to littization, and we are looking forward to more work. jay, who i just met a moment ago, i think we all here realize that serious thought an international affairs requires the widest range of reference that you can't just focus on one corner of the strategic realm, and you see his name, the authors line, you know you're about to get something with tremendous explanatory power, and with writings that go across the culture of the country and the arts. calling into account that annual fraud, the nobel peace prize -- [laughter] after they call it, nobody can ever say "nobel peace prize" again without saying so ironically. i'll turn it over to them, and i think we'll start with elliot, if that's okay. >> thank
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
along the border playing share if this is where politicians from washington come to talk tough about the border keeping america safe. they don't actually come here with a circle the helicopters and then drive to the ranch areas feeding on the summer in their role county. one day they build taller fence and hire more agents and make it impossible to drive north without going to the border patrol agent check ports with dogs. nothing stops the flow of cubans going north. for years i walked mountains, the mountains and have taken note of your and try to differentiate between the mountain lion skat and the wildcat mines along the trail with a detailed and drilling down the hill. i think of all of the souls that what the mountains at night and the ones that scratched the hole in the mountain hoping to make small fortunes. some did but most did not and most of them died early. all this heavy-metal might be easier to forget if i hadn't heard heard the rumors that they would reopen the mine which would effectively alter the economic and cultural landscape of the town. this makes me realize i
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 3:30pm EST
was hosted by politics & prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of begin the conversation is to say the rich have always been with us, after all. and, actually, that's not true. and one of the points, really the starting point of my book is to say, actually, things are different now. and we really need to be aware of this new political and economic reality that income inequality has grown hugely in the united states and in the western industrialized world and, indeed, around the world and that a lot of the action is at the very top -- is that better? okay. i'm so short, i have to move the mic. a lot of the action is at the very, very top of the income distribution. so to just
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 1:25am EST
booktv.org. >> washington post correspondent and author, the newest book "little america, the war within the war for afghanistan." mr. chandrasekaran, when you talk about the little war, what are you talking about? >> the communities built in southern afghanistan, not in the last couple years, but six decades ago back when unknown to most of the country mern, there were dozen of americans engineers there back in the 40s and 50s, digging canals, building dams, helping to nation build in afghanistan, and the very same terrain that president obama's troops surge unfolded in over the last couple years. in my history of obama's serge and examination of it, i actually start back in the 1940s in the remarkable period of american resistance to afghanistan, a period of great optimism when we built the town there that the afghans started to call little america, complete with a co-ed high school, a swimming pool where boys and girls swam together, a clubhouse to get a gin and tonic, and it was a period of great promise for the americans and afghans, and i use that as the opening for this boo
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:30am EST
of the less go for it for the grand crop of the order to some. in "the washington post" which rarely had much positive to say about the next demonstration of minute that she had quote threaded her way among all potential sources of trouble admirably and with skill. epitomizing the simple human response acquired by the the strategy the strategy of the editorials continue. she succeeded in communicating to the prevention that a genuine desire to help and to have done so with great tact for all of which he deserves much credit. if a chip to peru show the potential for a goodwill ambassador, her church the following year to africa despite her determination to break through the restraints of her first lady role. in early january 1972, pat set out on an eight day, 10,000-mile trip to the african continent where she visited liberia, and the ivory coast. the primary mission of the trip was to participate in the inauguration of william holden the new president of liberia. for the first time the first lady would be the official representative of the united states. as such, pat private -- as we
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:00pm EST
and then we discuss them. >> host: dear ms. washington? >> guest: i miss the little bit of power you have when you're a government office because no matter how small the agency and how miniscule the power, when people at goblins, you can sometimes help them. as far as the commission is concerned, i miss being able to bring people who no one heard from, no one would listen to and listen to what they have to say. >> host: is is your third, fourth book? >> guest: know, i've written many more books than not. probably nine or 10 books. >> host: is there another one coming? >> guest: another one right now. the topic is what does it mean mean -- it is on voter fraud. i found documents from a place in louisiana of all places, where they seem to have had a persistent record of voter fraud from an 18th century until now. it's bipartisan and so i was given some record from the voter fraud that goes down there that no one else has. and so i've been reading them. so this book would be if you really want to see voter suppression, here is voter suppression. >> host: when can we expect that will? >>
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 3:30pm EST
washington and our inability to get together across party lines to bring our country back into fiscal balance and to show the country and the world that we have a political system here that is capable of fixing our problems. bob -- earlier this year, bob carr, foreign minister of australia -- one of our greatest allies in the world -- said -- and i quote -- that "the united states is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence." the u.s. is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence, perhaps because some -- i'm so proud of this country, i'd say we're one budget deal away from restoring our global dominance for a considerable number of years. unfortunately, after i hope and pray we adopt the result of the negotiations going on now and avoid the fiscal cliff, we'll still be one grand bargain, budget deal away from restoring our -- our global preeminence. that work has to be done. but at least we will have avoided the cliff. mr. president, by a twist of fate, the occupant of the chair is my colleague and friend, the senator from connecticut, so like -- you'
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:00pm EST
old washington hand and that is ambassador stuart eisenstadt. he is also author. ambassador eisenstadt, wiry writing a book about the future of the jewish. >> we survived 3000 years of calamities culminating in a holocaust of her own time and yet we have survived and thrived and continued to societies, even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges and the question is, having survived this terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success and integration. a look at this from two perspectives. i look at the global forces that affect america, american jews and israel, everything for the shift of power from the united states and the west to china and the east, the powers of globalization of the digital era about how to deal with the 1.6 million muslims in the world come across to the iranian nuclear power. and i also like an internal press, low birthrates, assimilation and whether we can in effect succeeded at a time that we are more successful than matter and integrated into a society. it is a new phenomenon and that's why wanted to
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 11:00pm EST
the senate. kennedy. mrs. kennedy, then bradley and his wife called tony. brad day, washington and your chief brought his reporter who later became an jim cannon who served president ford. they decided to make a tape not his decision but the kind of person that he is. we will talk about it after you listen. >> when was the moment you were absolutely ? >> to get the support it is just long long long. why? >> host: one thing that has been said about president kennedy he could be dispassionately analytical to talk about himself. right as a presidential campaign is beginning like he is the third party. >> what struck me about the dinner party conversation was how much he enjoyed politics. his passion. this is true with the tapes of the oval office. the delight of political life comes through very powerful and his conception was absolutely right. of the 19th century presidents did not do much with the tariff, slavery issue, but by the time of the presidency it was seen as a vaster institution of political life. >> host: feel free. >> i love said dinner party tape it was just given to th
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 3:00pm EST
spent some time at the washington institute, and he served as chief of staff to ehud barak, and i put this question to him of how the israelis look out at the world and the lack of the, the weaknesses of the diplomatic side of their civil institutions. and he looked at me very straightforwardly and said we don't have american culture here. you should start with that. we are still in the process of developing civilian bodies, but for now the whole culture of decision making revolves around the military. it's as simple as that. in israel today the foreign ministry stands as the only bastion of israeli diplomacy. it is the house that sherrod built. yet the person who occupy os the sherrod chair of statesmanship and diplomacy is avision door lieberman who is not that interested in diplomacy, especially with the arabs, and if he had a policy, it is more than likely to abdicate the expulsion of arabs than engaging them. so to a great extent in the legacy of ben-gurion's organizational decade has made in israel the army as the country a civilianized army and a militarized civilian cultur
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 12:00pm EST
you're in washington and in bureaucracies, you know, you have a lot of people pontificating about the state of american manufacturing and what we need to do without actually engaging and talking to manufacturers, and, particularly, not talking to small and medium-sized manufacturers. the large manufacturers, the ceos, are often represented on policy think tanks, but the reality is almost half of the manufacturing jobs are with small and medium sized businesses. i decided that i wanted to talk to some of these small and medium sized businesses and figure out what it was that was givenning them a comparative advantage, and one of the arguments i made in the book is our entrepreneurial culture that allows us to have the advantage. i don't mean the entrepreneur at the top, the steve jobs model or the great industrialists. what i mean is that companies that do well in the manufacturing space listen to the ideas of their employees, and are encouraging employees to come up with efficiencies this production to figure out how to assemble things more efficiently or how to make products that
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:00pm EST
production version. when i began editing the world at "the washington post" in the '90s, american publishers were producing 50,000 books per year. ten years later, i'm still seeing the same position, and then they were producing 30,000 books annually. we were getting 100, 150 books a day, 40,000 books a year, only 1600 would be reviewed. in 2007, that number climbed to 415,000 books a year, published by american publishers. in 2009, a mere two years later, 1,100,000 books were published according to welcker. two thirds of number seven hundred 25,000 self published. you see that the whole idea of self-publishing, the social media that is what they reported. i suspect that only a portion of those would be published by university presses. it means less and less of a market for each title. the average book in america, believe it or not, sells 250 copies per year. when you average the millions that stephen king myself, and the one that unites elle of your life if you were to be self published. the american association of publishers concluded that actually this is the interesting part f
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 12:15am EST
theater 80 percent in this country do feature premium dlp and of the washington and it was getting quality, grape color saturation in amazing definition, high resolution in your not losing some of the impact you normally would get when you get a lesser technology in the same dlp technology that you find it a movie screen which to be 40 or 50 ft. wide or more, you will the same technology on the 73 in.. >>host: is what this is my favorite television to sell but harris's got a new television in there over the moon but when it bought the television they have to buy the supple for, other stuff but this is out of the box, a home of cinema. this is a man cave. we get at home, you are done and that is why i said, this isn't great experience and we were doing lennon's last hour, across the set my jawdropped, it is that good but the thing about the tvs this is the next generation technology but mitsubishi has perfected this and this is what to sell out every single time a bill for them. this is only for this show, this and what ever you to see the quantity left, every single one of these wi
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 4:00am EST
fantastic, here we have the washington redskins tonight was asking the last time, why is that they pick? >>guest: that in the '80s they had the great linemen during a time when there were wearing the super yet the hot. you see the hawks in the stands. there are guys up there blocking every single day and they're not right halves right now-- hogs that is why they have this tax.hat. >>host: embarrass the and in the bears had is sold. yet it is available and very popular get to this holidayn, buy more and save to add to end to be the extra gift in for somebody don't know what to give to them. i do know if you know who their team is, if you know they have a great team, you know that they love it and that they have followed in cared about it, they probably do have a teacher they love boat a hat bailout but they do not have a mascot hat, to wear this on their head and to put on display and their man cave, this is a very wonderful gift idea and for under $18, or you really cannot go wrong. i do love this is a secret santa gift. this is a way to get something special and memorable. >>guest
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